In the previous column, I discussed how to use the Surge Storm to improve pillar stability and total body strength. In this column, I will demonstrate how to use the newer, more compact Surge Riptide to perform one of my favorite lateral chain exercises. The Riptide is 33” long compared to its larger Storm counterpart at 42”. This makes it a little more portable and easier to use for certain exercises.

    Often, I see clients with poor posture who are unable to stabilize their body against resistance. The suitcase carry is an excellent strengthening exercise that can be used to improve lateral pillar stability, promote proper posture, and resolve any imbalances that may exist between the left and right side of the body.

    Execution: Fill the Surge Riptide with the desired amount of water to achieve the ideal weight or challenge level for the client. Grasp and hold the Riptide with the left hand using the long straight handle. Position the feet shoulder width apart and properly align the head, shoulders and spine so everything is neutral. It will be important to find the ideal position on the long handle so that when the water moves it does not face the Riptide to tip too far in one direction or the other.

    Once a stable, comfortable position is achieved with the core actively engaged, begin walking forward at a steady even pace. Walk for 20-25 yards and then switch sides and return to the start position. Perform 2-3 reps on each side, or use this as part of a circuit. If the client struggles, decrease the water level or distance covered. For advanced users, add water or increase the distance traveled prior to switching sides.

    This exercise is very effective for increasing pillar strength, stability and endurance. It will also improve shoulder stability, grip strength and postural awareness. I feel the Riptide is the perfect size for this particular exercise, and it offers a unique challenge with the water shifting back and forth in the sagittal plane as the client works to avoid the pull of the weight in the frontal plane.

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