When I speak to a new coaching client they always want to know the best method to get more clients right now. In today's world, technology provides so many viable new options for marketing than were previously accessible. Many of these options cost pennies compared to more traditional means. In fact, there are a handful of mediums that are my goto elements and I spend many hours a week teaching them repeatedly.

However, this article is not about those mediums and strategies and here's why; as good and reliable as they are the catalyst that brings all your mediums together is a strong brand foundation that, these days, seems to be often forgotten or overlooked.

Now by your local brand, or brand foundation, I don't mean the catchy business name or the fancy logo that you would pay some media company way too much to develop. What I'm referring to by local brand is your presence in the community.

It's easy to become dependent on email, social media and all kinds of electronic channels, and hard to find time to hit the pavement and get out in the community. Let me put it simply though, the difference between the trainer who "makes a living" vs "builds a business" will be the one will to do what others are not. If you're willing to invest time on a weekly basis to build your local brand I can promise you that every other strategy you try will work that much better.

In many ways you have a bigger opportunity than any large corporation for building your local brand. When you interact directly with people and share your charm, enthusiasm and sincerity for changing lives they will remember you. In a world where you often feel like a number, or that you don't matter, we as consumers look forward to and demand a level of personal attention that only you the small business can hope to provide. Make a point to interact with your community on a regular basis and when they see your smiling face on any future marketing you'll begin to notice an increased response.

Some of the things I've always done to increase my local brand are:

1) Waiting room content -- I've taken a couple articles I've written and added my photos, company header and contact information and printed a bunch of copies. I've dropped these off to medical offices, chiropractors, salons, etc. Anywhere with a waiting room, and remember it's always a good idea to include a high value opt-in or trial via a URL to a squeeze page.

2) Seminars -- If I could put ten people or more in a room I was happy to come educate. Athletic shoe stores, supplement stores, private therapies like those listed above, accounting firms, and social groups are all great places to start.

3) Product endorsements -- I've written product endorsements or provided workout plans or nutritional guidelines to compliment uses of nutritional products at health food stores.

4) Lead warm-ups at local fitness events -- If there's a local fun run or charity event we've often donated and in exchange asked if we could lead the warm-up.

These are just a few things you can try that a very low cost, of course if you have some budget to contribute to branding there's always a number more options you may also consider; but one thing is for certain investing in your local brand is a sure way to make all of your marketing work better as a whole.


After struggling for eight years as a personal trainer, Cabel McElderry challenged the typical gym setup and created quite a reputation for himself. His 7 figure studio, now five years old, has won multiple awards for business excellence. Cabel has been recognized as one of the top 100 fitness entrepreneurs in North America and is currently one of 50 nominees for Optimum Nutrition's Canadian Trainer of the Year. He now mentors fitness professionals worldwide in an effort to help them achieve similar or better results than his own. Cabel's advice and writing can be found amongst some of the biggest blogs online and he is constantly called upon to offer his advice and strategies at some the largest fitness events worldwide. www.ProfitablePersonalTrainer.com

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